Moving Walls 14

Moving Walls 14 marks the 10th anniversary of the Open Society Foundations’ group photography exhibition. The photographers in Moving Walls 14 continue to document issues central to our mission—promoting democratic governance, human rights, and economic, legal, and social reform—that deserve attention yet are often neglected by mainstream media.

Man with umbrella in front of dome.
Moving Walls 14
George Georgiou
Church pews with flag.
Moving Walls 14
Katrina Media Fellows, Salimah Ali, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Keith Calhoun, Gerald Cyrus, Collette V. Fournier, Russell K. Frederick, Stanley Greene, Wayne Lawrence, Kadir van Lohuizen, Chandra McCormick, John Pinderhughes, Joseph Rodriguez, Radcliffe Roye, Frank Stewart, Shawn Walker, Clarence Williams, Michael Williamson

About Moving Walls 14

Moving Walls 14 marks the 10th anniversary of the Open Society Foundations' group photography exhibition. Over the years, Moving Walls has featured more than 100 photographers and examined timely and significant human rights, humanitarian, and social justice issues: the break-up of the Soviet Union; wars in Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq; the AIDS epidemic; the growing political influence of Islam; global migration; the rights of minorities; conflict over natural resources; the aftermath of warfare in Latin America during the 1980s; the dramatically flawed U.S. criminal justice system; and the transformation of traditional societies into modern, heavily industrialized nations.

The photographers in Moving Walls 14 continue in this tradition and document issues central to the Open Society’s mission—promoting democratic governance, human rights, and economic, legal, and social reform—that deserve attention yet are often neglected by mainstream media.

Examining everyday life and the dramatically altered rural landscape, George Georgiou captures the effect of rapid modernization and urbanization on Turkey’s national psyche.

In Nigeria, Ed Kashi battled extreme conditions in order to tell the story of half a century of oil exploration and production and its devastating consequences in the Niger Delta.

Through images, the Katrina Media Fellows aim to deepen public understanding of the critical issues laid bare by the hurricane—the failure of public policy and the government’s response; misuse of public funds; the role of private contractors; ineffective clean-up and rebuilding efforts; and the continued impact on residents and the displaced, years after the storm.

Dana Popa’s photographs and interviews explore the situation of women from Moldova who survived sex trafficking and were able to return to their home country.

When most people have all but forgotten the Rwandan genocide, Jonathan Torgovnik uses portraits and text of women raped during the genocide and their subsequent children to remind the world of the legacy and lasting scars that remain as a society attempts to rebuild.

Moving Walls is an annual documentary photography exhibition produced by the Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project. Moving Walls is exhibited at our offices in New York, London, and Washington, D.C., and includes five to seven discrete bodies of work.

Since its inception in 1998, Moving Walls has featured over 175 artists whose works address a variety of social justice and human rights issues that coincide with the Open Society mission.

Are You a Photographer?

Prospective candidates should check back in July 2014, when we announce the call for submissions for our next exhibition, Moving Walls 23.

Plan a Visit

Moving Walls 21 is open free-of-charge to the public through October 3, 2014. Stay tuned for Moving Walls 22, which opens October 30, 2014.