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Access to Medicines

Access to Medicines

Despite advances in medical science, affordable safe and effective medicines remain inaccessible to billions of people worldwide. The Open Society Foundations support efforts to increase access to essential medicines for people in low-resource countries, especially for poor and marginalized populations.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Access to Medicines. Hide info

Recent Work

Briefing Paper
Access to Medicines and the Global Fund

There are growing concerns that the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria is fundamentally altering its approach to access to medicines. This briefing paper explores five key areas that illustrate these concerns.

Voices
The Way We Get New Medicines Doesn’t Work  

A new documentary details the many ways in which medical innovation prioritizes corporate interests.

Voices
How Drug Companies and Bad Patents Put Lives at Risk  

By manipulating a system meant to reward innovation, Big Pharma keeps prices high and competition away.

Event
Sex, Drugs, and Canadian Politics: Advancing Human Rights for Sex Workers and People Who Use Drugs  

Pivot Legal Society’s Katrina Pacey and Adrienne Smith discuss how the organization is advancing rights in Canada through litigation and advocacy.

Voices
Mass Deaths in Crimea as Russia Bans Methadone  

The annexation of Crimea upended many lives—particularly those whose life-saving treatments for drug dependence were abruptly taken away.

Voices
Will the Syriza Party Solve Greece’s Health Care Crisis?

After years of rampant unemployment, nearly one in five Greeks lacks health insurance. Now, access to medicines must be a priority for the new government.

Open Society People

Director
Public Health Program, Open Society Foundations–New York
Project Director, Access to Medicines
Open Society Foundations–New York, Public Health Program