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International Justice

International Justice

The Open Society Foundations seek to reduce impunity for serious crimes by helping domestic and international tribunals conduct effective investigations, carry out fair trials, and engage victims and affected communities.

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The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

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Recent Work

Voices
Justice in Guatemala: New Efforts, Continuing Threats

Almost 20 years after the end of Guatemala’s bitter civil war, victims of human rights atrocities are still waiting for offenders to be brought to justice. Their quest is now at a critical crossroads.

Voices
Trying Khmer Rouge Leaders Twice: A Guide for the Perplexed

Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge tribunal has begun a second trial on charges including genocide of two aged former Khmer Rouge senior leaders although both have already received life sentences for other crimes against humanity.

Voices
No Summer Break: Repression in and around Russia Has Been Heating Up

The large-scale crises we see around the world today began with the kind of arrests, censorship, and everyday repression happening in Russia and the surrounding region.

Voices
After More Than a Decade, the Truth About CIA Torture in Poland

The European Court of Human Rights sent a clear message that abuses perpetrated by the CIA will not be tolerated in modern Europe, and those who perpetrate them will be held accountable.

Voices
To Strengthen the ICC, Look to Its Member States

July 17 marks the anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute that created the International Criminal Court. Carlos Castresana, the noted Spanish jurist, outlines some ideas for change.

Publication
Migrant Workers’ Access to Justice at Home: Nepal

This report is the first comprehensive analysis of how laws and institutions in Nepal succeed or fail in protecting migrant workers from harms suffered during recruitment or while working in the Middle East.