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Access to Medicines

Access to Medicines

Despite advances in medical science, affordable safe and effective medicines remain inaccessible to billions of people worldwide. The Open Society Foundations support efforts to increase access to essential medicines for people in low-resource countries, especially for poor and marginalized populations.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

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Recent Work

Voices
Celebrating 10 Years of Investing in Roma Health  

First established in 2008, the Roma Health Scholarships Program was intended to support young Roma trying to ensure their communities got the health care they deserved. More than a decade later, there’s no doubt it worked.

Event
Book Launch—The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy    

In her critically acclaimed new book, Mariana Mazzucato calls for a public debate about what is really adding value to our economies, so that we can create a new form of capitalism that works for us all.

Explainer
What Is the Global Gag Rule?

Many people have heard of the "global gag rule," but what it actually does—and why it fails women and those who want fewer unsafe abortions—is less understood. This explainer answers some basic and crucial questions.

Event
The Global Pain Crisis: Narrowing the Gap in Access to Palliative Care    

A panel of health experts discuss fighting for better access to pain relief for palliative care in India and Latin America.

Event
Drugs and the Darknet: Challenges and Opportunities  

A conversation about how darknet markets, or “cryptomarkets,” are changing the way that people buy, sell, use, and make drugs around the world

Publication
Lost in Transition: Three Case Studies of Global Fund Withdrawal in South Eastern Europe

These case studies from Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia highlight the challenges of transition to domestic financing of HIV programs after the withdrawal of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.