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Drug Policy Reform in the United States

Drug Policy Reform in the United States

The Open Society Foundations support drug policy reform efforts in the United States that address the health, safety, and social harms associated with drug use and drug markets, while reducing the high levels of incarceration, racial injustice, and violation of individual rights associated with current drug policy.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Drug Policy Reform in the United States. Hide info

Recent Work

Event
The Museum of Drug Policy

This pop-up cultural hub includes an immersive art experience and special live programming looking at the impact of current drug policies on populations around the world.

Voices
Why President Obama Must Go to UNGASS

Only by joining the world's leaders at the UN's meeting on global drug policy can Obama signal his seriousness about reform.

Voices
Separating Fact from Fiction in the Cannabis Debate

With the rapid movement on cannabis regulation happening around the world, it’s more important than ever that the public gets the hard facts.

Voices
An Innovative Drug Policy That Works

A program that sends people convicted of low-level drug and sex work crimes to community-based services instead of jail is off to a good start in Seattle.

Event
Protecting Women and Families from the War on Drugs: UN Sessions

This panel will present research demonstrating how the drug war particularly harms women, and will explore leveraging upcoming UN convenings to better promote and protect the human rights of women and families.

Event
Drugs Courts: A Fresh Approach or a Continuation of the Old Paradigm?  

Drug courts, presented as an alternative to incarceration, are themselves controversial and problematic. Do these mandatory, court-supervised drug treatment programs hold up to scrutiny?