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Drug Policy Reform

Drug Policy Reform

Prohibition-based policies have led to a rise in drug-related violence, prison overcrowding, and an increase in HIV epidemics. The Open Society Foundations support organizations that put forward alternatives.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Drug Policy Reform. Hide info

Recent Work

Event
Protecting Women and Families from the War on Drugs: UN Sessions

This panel will present research demonstrating how the drug war particularly harms women, and will explore leveraging upcoming UN convenings to better promote and protect the human rights of women and families.

Event
Sex, Drugs, and Canadian Politics: Advancing Human Rights for Sex Workers and People Who Use Drugs  

Pivot Legal Society’s Katrina Pacey and Adrienne Smith discuss how the organization is advancing rights in Canada through litigation and advocacy.

Event
Drugs Courts: A Fresh Approach or a Continuation of the Old Paradigm?  

Drug courts, presented as an alternative to incarceration, are themselves controversial and problematic. Do these mandatory, court-supervised drug treatment programs hold up to scrutiny?

Voices
Mass Executions of Drug Offenders Won’t Help Indonesia

On January 18, six people convicted of drug crimes were put to death in Indonesia, perhaps signaling a brutal escalation of the country’s war against drugs.

Voices
Know the Warning Signs: The Dangers of Drug Policy Abuse  

A series of “PSAs” encourages voters to reach out to lawmakers whose support for criminalization policies is harming public health.

Event
Disappearances in Mexico: A Report From the Legal Team for the 43 Students Abducted in Iguala  

Human Rights Center of the Mountain Tlachinollan provides updates concerning the case of the 43 students from Ayotzinapa who were kidnapped and are presumed to have been murdered in Iguala.

Open Society People

Director
Global Drug Policy Program, Open Society Foundations–New York