Law and Health

Law and Health

The Open Society Foundations promote societies in which the rule of law and respect for human rights safeguard the health of all, especially the most vulnerable. This includes people living with HIV or tuberculosis, people needing palliative care, people who use drugs, people with disabilities, prisoners, ethnic minorities, sex workers, and sexual minorities.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

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Recent Work

Event
Count the Costs of the “War on Drugs”  

Representatives from a coalition of rights-based organizations discuss their call for a new approach to United Nations drug policy.

Event
Combining Litigation with Social Mobilization: Pitfalls and Possibilities

Two of South Africa’s most recognized legal activists talk about using the law to campaign for the human rights of people living with HIV.

Voices
Four Key Lessons from Teaching Human Rights for Health

For seven years, Open Society has joined medical and law schools to develop 25 courses on human rights and patient care. Here's what it takes to support new generations of rights-respecting health and legal practitioners.

Voices
University Law Clinics and the Growing Demand for EU Law

EU law affects the lives of virtually everyone living and working in the European Union, but not enough public interest lawyers specialize in this field. Clinical legal education seeks to close the gap.

Voices
Five Legal Strategies that Preserve the Rights of Women Living with HIV

Women living with HIV can easily lose their homes and property. The resulting hardship can keep them from treatment, and dependent in relationships. But these legal strategies can help protect their rights and their health.

Voices
In South Africa, Sex Workers Arm Themselves with the Law  

As a criminalized group, sex workers risk abuse form both clients and police alike. Now, sex workers in South Africa offer each other support and legal advice, empowering one another to realize their rights.