Soros/Sundance Documentary Fund: A Tenth-Anniversary Film Series

Soros/Sundance Documentary Fund: A Tenth-Anniversary Film Series

The Open Society Institute and the Sundance Institute present a series of nineteen of the most provocative documentaries made with support from the Soros/Sundance Documentary Fund. All movies will be shown at Film Forum. For more information and to purchase tickets, see the Film Forum website.

Thursday, October 26

1:30 p.m.

Stranger with a Camera (Elizabeth Barret, 2000). A thoughtful examination into the murder of a Canadian filmmaker who traveled to Appalachia in the 1960s to document poverty.

4:00 p.m.

Long Night’s Journey into Day (Frances Reid and Deborah Hoffman, 1999). An inspiring portrait of four cases brought before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, illustrating South Africa’s quest for restorative justice.

7:00 p.m.

Calling the Ghosts: A Story about Rape, War, and Women (Mandy Jacobson and Karmen Jelincic, 1996). A gripping account of the struggle for justice by two Bosnian women raped in a Serbian concentration camp. Preceded by Red Rubber Boots (Jasmila Zbanic, 2000), a haunting portrayal of one woman’s search for the remains of her family, who were killed by the Serbian army during the Bosnian war.

Friday, October 27

1:30 p.m.

Hillbrow Kids (Michael Hammon and Jacqueline Gögen, 1999). A revealing conversation with street children in Johannesburg coping with the hardships of post-apartheid South Africa.

4:00 p.m.

Southern Comfort (Kate Davis, 2000). A moving depiction of the lethal cost of discrimination in the United States today, through the story of a female-to-male transsexual who dies of ovarian cancer after repeatedly being denied medical treatment. Followed by a conversation with the director.

6:30 p.m.

Children Underground (Edet Belzberg, 2001). An intimate look at the lives of abandoned and runaway youths who make their home below the streets of Bucharest, Romania. Followed by a conversation with the director.

9:00 p.m.

Persons of Interest (Alison Maclean and Tobias Perse, 2003). Former detainees of South Asian and Middle Eastern descent who were arbitrarily arrested and interrogated in the aftermath of September 11, 2001, tell their stories. Followed by a conversation with the directors. Preceded by Asylum (Sandy McLeod and Gini Reticker, 2003). A young Ghanaian woman seeks refugee status in the United States to escape the threat of female genital mutilation.

Saturday, October 28

1:30 p.m.

Iran: Veiled Appearances (Thierry Michel, 2002). An unprecedented glimpse into the fractured society of Iran, exploring the lives of students, soldiers, artists, and religious figures.

3:30 p.m.

Punitive Damage (Annie Goldson, 1999). After her son is shot by the Indonesian military a mother sets out on a quest for truth and justice that brings her to an American courtroom and puts the Indonesian government on trial. Preceded by Still Standing: A Youth Organizers Television (YO-TV) Documentary on Hurricane Katrina (2006). A poignant story of the challenges faced by a Hurricane Katrina survivor six months after the storm, documented by a group of student filmmakers. Followed by a conversation with the director and crew members.

6:30 p.m.

My American Dream: How Democracy Works Now (Shari Robertson and Michael Camerini, work-in-progress). An exploration into the lives of 24 people engaged in the struggle surrounding U.S. immigration policy. Followed by a conversation with the directors.

9:00 p.m.

One Day in September (Kevin MacDonald). A gripping account of the attack on Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics, weaving archival footage with contemporary interviews.

Sunday, October 29

1:30 p.m.

Senorita Extraviada (Missing Young Woman) (Lourdes Portillo, 2001). A haunting investigation into the disappearance of hundreds of young women in Juárez, Mexico. Preceded by There Are Women in Russian Villages (Pavel Kostomarov and Antoin Kattin, 2006), a troubling look at the feminization of poverty in Russia, where women are the poorest members of the population.

4:00 p.m.

Life and Debt (Stephanie Black, 2001). An unsparing depiction of the impact of globalization on Jamaica, with narration written by Jamaica Kincaid.

6:30 p.m.

The Inner Tour (Ra'anan Alexandrowicz, 2001). A story of a group of Palestinians traveling around Israel for the first time, filmed just months before Middle East tensions escalated in 2000.

9:00 p.m.

Liberia: An Uncivil War (Jonathan Stack and James Brabazon, 2004). An inside look at the civil war in Liberia and the siege of its capital, including exclusive interviews with former president Charles Taylor. Followed by a conversation with the director.

 

Date: October 26, 2006October 29, 2006
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location:

New York City