Law and Health

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Law and Health

Law and Health

The Open Society Foundations promote societies in which the rule of law and respect for human rights safeguard the health of all, especially the most vulnerable. This includes people living with HIV or tuberculosis, people needing palliative care, people who use drugs, people with disabilities, prisoners, ethnic minorities, sex workers, and sexual minorities.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Law and Health. Hide info

Recent Work

Event
To Protect and Serve: A Conversation About Sex Work, Policing, and Health

Join the New York City HIV Planning Group and the Open Society Public Health Program for a conversation about sex work, policing, and health in New York.

Event
An Evening with Drs. Chris Beyrer and Jennifer Leaning

The Open Society Public Health Program hosts an evening event with Drs. Chris Beyrer and Jennifer Leaning in honor of their years of service on the Public Health Program Advisory Board.

Publication
Using the UN Human Rights System to Advocate for Access to Palliative Care and Pain Relief

This toolkit is a guide to using the United Nations human rights system to advocate for increased access to palliative care and pain relief as a human right.

Voices
How Attorneys in Ukraine Can Use Health Law to Save Lives

In Ukraine and other parts of the world, attorneys who understand how laws governing justice and health intersect have a much better chance of protecting their clients—both literally and legally.

Voices
How Reproductive Justice Serves as a Model for Progressive Organizing  

Groundswell Fund’s Naa Hammond explains why reproductive justice is about more than reproductive rights, and why movements for transformative change must be intersectional.

Voices
How Drug Courts Are Falling Short

The “drug court” alternative-sentencing model has spread across the United States. It may be increasingly common, but the drug court model often fails to respect human rights.