Building a Better Brazil

Rates of police violence in Brazil are among the highest in the world. Economically speaking, Brazil is also among the most unequal countries. Despite being the eighth-largest economy in the world, as many as half of its citizens live at or below the poverty line.

UNEafro Brazil works with university students and other youth in communities that have been hardest hit by violence and poverty. Through direct action, mobilization, and education, the organization draws attention to the rights of black and impoverished youth and other members of the Afro Brazilian community who face multiple forms of discrimination.

In the video above, Douglas Belchior, one of UNEafro Brazil’s founders, talks about what it is like to live in Brazil’s favelas: the violence, the lack of educational and entertainment opportunities, and the near-constant police presence.

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3 Comments

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Ridicolous

You are enphasing the class fight in Brazil.

There is no a fight between black and white people.

The police is not guilty of the violence.The violence comes from the assassins and robbers.

There are more sofisticated weapons on assassin hands than on the police hands.

This is not a clear vision from Brazil.

Sr Campos - your viewpoint is slightly skewed. The violence on both sides is abhorrent, with the rates of youth violence akin to a war zone in Iraq. Policing is more military than civil and needs a lot of work.

Regardless of who is right or who is wrong, here we have an organization, which is giving support to those who are at the losing end. That is a compassionate action.
George Soros is a white man with an elevated conscience, and Martin Luther King was a black man with an elevated conscience.
Excellence is not defined by skin color.
Each society projects it´s movie on the wall of the Plateau´s Cave. George Soros and his team are showing the way out of that cave into the life in the open.
Open Society - that is.

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