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Harm Reduction

Harm Reduction

Harm reduction is a range of evidence-based approaches that recognize that people unable or unwilling to abstain from illicit drug use can still make positive choices to protect their own health in addition to the health of their families and communities. The Open Society Foundations advocate for policies and practices that advance the health and human rights of people who use drugs.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Harm Reduction. Hide info

Recent Work

Voices
Moving the Needle on Drug Policy in Asia

Asia boasts some of the harshest laws in the world; however, there are regional pioneers that are charting new courses on drug policy.

Event
Count the Costs of the “War on Drugs”  

Representatives from a coalition of rights-based organizations discuss their call for a new approach to United Nations drug policy.

Event
Combining Litigation with Social Mobilization: Pitfalls and Possibilities

Two of South Africa’s most recognized legal activists talk about using the law to campaign for the human rights of people living with HIV.

Voices
License to Deceive? A Big Drug Company’s Smokescreen on Hepatitis C

What’s really driving the pharmaceutical giant Gilead to issue a license for generic copies of its superstar drug? Profit.

Event
Updates from Ukraine: Implications of a “Post-Maidan” Environment for Open Society  

Inna Pidluska of Ukraine’s International Renaissance Foundation discusses Ukraine’s evolving political culture, early elections, and potential opportunities for civil society and parliamentarians to pursue a reform agenda.

Voices
How Drug Trafficking Undermines West Africa  

The rise of drug trafficking is undermining institutions, health, and development efforts in West Africa. It's time for political leaders to change the ineffective policies that exacerbate the problem.

Open Society People

Director, International Harm Reduction Development
Public Health Program, Open Society Foundations–New York

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