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Harm Reduction

Harm Reduction

Harm reduction is a range of evidence-based approaches that recognize that people unable or unwilling to abstain from illicit drug use can still make positive choices to protect their own health in addition to the health of their families and communities. The Open Society Foundations advocate for policies and practices that advance the health and human rights of people who use drugs.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Harm Reduction. Hide info

Recent Work

Voices
How Macedonia’s Bureaucracy Is Failing Young People

Too many of the country’s institutions are simply not equipped with the medicine, expertise, or guidance they need to help young people who are using drugs.

Event
Drugs and the Darknet: Challenges and Opportunities  

A conversation about how darknet markets, or “cryptomarkets,” are changing the way that people buy, sell, use, and make drugs around the world

Voices
Sex Workers Demand Justice

A recent tragedy in Queens, New York, served as a reminder of the criminal justice system's disregard for sex workers’ lives. It’s time for policymakers to prove they mean it when they champion human rights.

Voices
Macedonia’s Lessons for Fighting HIV

When a key funder pulled back, many advocates for people in Macedonia with HIV feared the worst. But thanks to a mix of grassroots advocacy and targeted political outreach, the fight against the epidemic continues.

Voices
A Blind Spot in the Movement Against Gender-Based Violence

When women seek treatment for their drug use, they often find themselves in unsafe environments. Activists working to end gender-based violence need to do more to reach out to these women and make them part of the solution.

Publication
Lost in Transition: Three Case Studies of Global Fund Withdrawal in South Eastern Europe

These case studies from Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia highlight the challenges of transition to domestic financing of HIV programs after the withdrawal of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.