Harm Reduction

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Harm Reduction

Harm Reduction

Harm reduction is a range of evidence-based approaches that recognize that people unable or unwilling to abstain from illicit drug use can still make positive choices to protect their own health in addition to the health of their families and communities. The Open Society Foundations advocate for policies and practices that advance the health and human rights of people who use drugs.

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Programs

The following Open Society programs focus on this topic.

More on the ideas and programs behind our work: Harm Reduction. Hide info

Recent Work

Event
Drugs in Documentary Films: A Showcase

The Open Society Foundations and PBS POV present an evening of excerpts from new documentary films exploring a range of harmful effects created by the current drug control regime.

Event
Talking About Race: Harm Reduction and Communities of Color

A discussion on the historical tensions between drug policy advocates and communities of color, which have carried the heaviest burden in both health consequences and punitive criminal justice responses to drug use.

Voices
How Drug Courts Are Falling Short

The “drug court” alternative-sentencing model has spread across the United States. It may be increasingly common, but the drug court model often fails to respect human rights.

Voices
The Dire Consequences of Slashing U.S. Global HIV Assistance

The Trump administration’s proposed cuts for programs devoted to fighting this disease would cost innocent lives as well as U.S. global influence.

Event
Addiction Now: Safe Injection Facilities as a Public Health Strategy

Join Open Society Institute–Baltimore and the New Day Campaign to discuss how safe injection facilities reduce overdoses and increase access to treatment.

Event
Locking Up Our Own: James Forman Jr. in Conversation with Khalil Gibran Muhammad  

A lunchtime conversation about James Foreman Jr.'s acclaimed new book on race and criminal justice, which traces the zero-tolerance approach to crime and drugs back to some unlikely origins.