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Students at a school table

Inclusive Education Reform Presents a Litmus Test for the Czech Republic

November 13, 2017Ostalinda Maya Ovalle, Štěpán Drahokoupil
Women walking along a street

Is Judicial Independence Finally Coming to Kyrgyzstan?

November 16, 2017Shamil Ibragimov, Joshua Russell
People inside a living room

After the Storm: Building a Better Houston

November 3, 2017John Henneberger

Open Society Voices

Rights & Justice

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After the Storm: Building a Better Houston

November 3, 2017 | John Henneberger

The unprecedented government funds to rebuild after Hurricane Harvey offer a unique opportunity to make a major down payment on equity.

Who Picks the Judges? On International Tribunals, Secrecy Too Often Prevails

November 3, 2017 | Christian De Vos

A new report looks at the often opaque processes surrounding the selection of judges and commissioners for human rights tribunals in Europe, Africa, and Latin America.

Keeping Youth Out of the Adult Criminal Justice System

October 24, 2017 | Marcy Mistrett

A new report documents major gains in the drive to reduce the number of youths in adult jails and prisons. How philanthropy can help with the challenges ahead.

The Theater Challenging One of the World’s Most Repressive Governments

October 23, 2017 | Rashida Bumbray

The Belarus Free Theatre has long been a monument to democracy and human rights—and the target of one of the world’s worst dictatorships. Cofounder Natalia Kaliada explains why, despite the persecution, the show goes on.

How the EU Is Failing Whistleblowers

October 13, 2017 | Peter Matjašič

In order for governments to be held accountable, those who flag corruption from the inside must be supported and protected from retaliation. In this respect, unfortunately, the EU and many member states are falling short.

What’s in Your Drinking Water? Too Many People Still Don’t Know

October 2, 2017 | Elizabeth Moses

This year’s International Right to Know Day was a reminder that despite the progress that’s been made, far too many people still don’t know the basic information they need to keep themselves and their loved ones healthy.

Azerbaijan’s Wrong Turn

September 29, 2017 | Melina Milazzo

Authorities in Baku appear to be newly reinvigorated in their war on Azerbaijani dissidents living in exile. A recent alleged kidnapping and a new report each offer a disturbing reminder of this rising threat to human rights.

The Reform U.S. Drone Policy Really Needs

September 1, 2017 | Alex Humphrey

As the new administration continues to adjust U.S. national security policy to its strategy, it is essential that regulations placed on drone strikes in order to protect civilians are strengthened—not weakened—for the future.

Q&A: The Promise of Resistance in Puerto Rico

August 31, 2017

Amid the island’s worst financial crisis ever, a fiscal control board has proposed deep cuts to Puerto Rico’s university system. Here’s how students on campus are battling back.

The Deep Roots of the U.S. Ban on Trans Soldiers

August 17, 2017 | Karen Stevenson

A proposal to exclude trans people from the U.S. military was greeted with widespread disapproval. But a new report reveals how often hatred of trans and gender-nonconforming people is not only tolerated, but encouraged.

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