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Students at a school table

Inclusive Education Reform Presents a Litmus Test for the Czech Republic

November 13, 2017Ostalinda Maya Ovalle, Štěpán Drahokoupil
Women walking along a street

Is Judicial Independence Finally Coming to Kyrgyzstan?

November 16, 2017Shamil Ibragimov, Joshua Russell
People inside a living room

After the Storm: Building a Better Houston

November 3, 2017John Henneberger

Open Society Voices

Rights & Justice

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Is Judicial Independence Finally Coming to Kyrgyzstan?

November 16, 2017 | Shamil Ibragimov, Joshua Russell

Sooronbai Jeenbekov’s victory in this year’s election could represent a breakthrough for those working for a stronger, more independent judiciary in Kyrgyzstan.

Azerbaijan’s Wrong Turn

September 29, 2017 | Melina Milazzo

Authorities in Baku appear to be newly reinvigorated in their war on Azerbaijani dissidents living in exile. A recent alleged kidnapping and a new report each offer a disturbing reminder of this rising threat to human rights.

Central Asia at History’s Crossroads

July 14, 2017 | Leonard Benardo

Central Asia’s long history of foreign and domestic repression is well known. Less appreciated, but just as important, is the on-the-ground progress happening across the region every day by civil society activists.

Children with Autism in Kyrgyzstan Gain a Helping Hand

March 31, 2017 | Tynymgul Eshieva

In a country where this vulnerable population is often denied adequate education and medical care, this organization is working to improve attitudes as well as access.

In Kazakhstan, Having a Disability Often Means Not Getting a Vote

November 16, 2016 | Parkhat Yussupjanov

Obstacles as simple as a lack of braille ballots can prevent people from exercising their right to vote.

Kazakhstan’s “Training Café” Serves Up Inclusion

April 29, 2016 | Ainur Shakenova

The café, staffed entirely by people with disabilities, is part of an effort to move people out of institutions and into the community and the workforce.

Case Watch: UN Rights Body Challenges Police Brutality in Kyrgyzstan

February 8, 2016 | Masha Lisitsyna

A case of brutality brought to the UN Human Rights Committee supports wider efforts to end torture and abuse by police in Kyrgyzstan.

Kyrgyzstan Enlists Hundreds of Doctors in Its Fight against Torture

January 13, 2016 | Nuriana Kartanbaeva

For years, Kyrgyzstan’s government denied allegations of torture. Today, not only is it acknowledging the problem—it’s helping to train medical professionals to stop it.

Slain Human Rights Lawyer Warned of Turkey’s “Existential Crisis”

November 30, 2015 | Erika Dailey

Tahir Elçi, a torture survivor who became one of Turkey’s best known human rights lawyers, was shot dead at a peace rally in southeast Turkey on Saturday.

Why Mothers of Children with Disabilities Are Suddenly Talking in Kyrgyzstan

November 17, 2015 | Kimberly O’Haver

In a country where disabilities invite stigma and discrimination, a discussion group is starting to change minds—and, possibly, laws.

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